how to (not) judge people’s importance

the other day, on my way out of the office I overheard a woman say to another (as they walked past homeless people sleeping on the sidewalk) “[Name] saw him and said ‘hey! good to see you — how’s it going!?’ so yeah, he must be really important.” — followed by laughter.

I didn’t find this funny, I found it sad and unfortunate.

the concept of applying varying degrees of importance to people in general is a counterproductive act, especially so if the basis is something as arbitrary as a person’s occupation — this is a gravely dangerous mistake that most of us are guilty of.

in my world, no one is more-or less-important than anyone.

everyone — from children to adults, bosses to those working ‘under’ us, homeless people to family, loved ones to strangers — deserves the same respect, love and compassion. ranking people’s importance based on any sort of social status is a breach in the social contract of life.

if we must rank importance, let it be based on the degree of one’s understanding of the following:

we are one family. no one know why we’re really here. no one actually knows what’s more important — instead we choose what’s important to us.

the more fair and generous you are in your distribution of importance, the more important you are. 

to be important is to understand that we are all one family, and to treat people as such.

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